Walking Holidays

Europe’s majestic mountains ~ with a genuine specialist
Organised & Self-guided Walking

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Tel. 01799 513331 - - Open Today - 9am to 5.30pmCollett's Ltd. is ABTA bonded W6883 - Travel with confidence
Organised & Self-guided Walking with a Genuine Specialist
Walking Holidays Dolomites

Your Online Handbook for the Italian Dolomites

We look forward to seeing you in the mountains. Please forward this link to all members of your party – and perhaps bookmark it for quick reference?
Any questions or concerns? Please call us on 01799 513331.

Essential Info.
Dolomites Handbook Information

Useful to know before you go

Arrival

On your arrival in the Dolomites, you will be asked to hand in the signed disclaimer sent to the person who booked the holiday prior to your departure. This should be signed by all members of your party. See the Disclaimer tab for a copy and more details.

We will also need to take a copy of your passports for the purposes of tourist registration, so please ensure you have your passport to hand or bring your own copy.

Banks

There are two banks in both Corvara and Badia ‐ both have cashpoints. Opening times (approx): Mon‐Fri, 8am ‐ 12pm & 3pm ‐4.15pm.

Chalets

Our Chalets are a ‘home from home’ with a big dose of hospitality thrown in by us. Our chalet hosts will make you welcome and comfortable and, backed up by the rest of our resort team, they will be a good source of local knowledge and ideas. A semi‐continental breakfast and an excellent three course dinner are taken around a large table, which is indicative of the convivial nature of a chalet holiday. Guests are welcome in the chalet during the day and you can help yourselves to complimentary tea and coffee or to a drink from the bar. Packed lunches are available daily and charged locally.

Day Off

We have our local day-off on a Wednesday. In our hosted chalets, breakfast is served but dinner is not included as a part of your half-board stay. Most guests use Wednesday as an opportunity to eat out locally. There are no organised walks and there is no Office Hour. You can subscribe to Thursday’s organised walks on Tuesday evening. If you are arriving on a Wednesday, there will be somebody around to meet you, settle you in, recommend somewhere to eat and pass on the walking options for the following day.

Dietary Requirements

We need to know of any dietary requirements at least 7 days before your holiday. Please contact us now if you have not informed us if you, or any of your party, are vegetarian, vegan or coeliac etc. Thank you.

Disclaimer & At Your Own Risk

During your stay, please always bear in mind that you are responsible for your own safety. You join organised walks at your own risk as part of an autonomous group, in which each member has a duty of care to each other. Similarly, we cannot be held responsible for the opinions and information we offer for self-guiding. In an age of litigation, we repeat the ‘at your own’ risk message at the start of each organised walk and it can become repetitive, but the message is too important.

Estimated Time of Arrival

Please contact us ASAP with your arrival time if you haven’t already. So that we can be there to greet you and settle you in. Please visit www.colletts.co.uk/eta and enter your details. Have a guess if you are not sure.

Fly-Drivers & Self-Drivers

According to the AA, all valid UK driving licenses should be accepted in Italy.
If you have booked a hire car, a credit (not debit!) card is essential. It is generally swiped but not debited, although it is wise to make sure it is not being debited.
You will also need your license DVLA Licence Check Code from the DVLA website.
Self-drivers should familiarise themselves with the driving requirements for Italy, and the compulsory equipment that must be carried in your car. See www.theaa.com
For driving directions see the Travel & Directions tab.

Hair Dryers

Hairdryers are provided in all of our hosted chalets. We have further hairdryers available for guests staying in self catering apartments – just ask if you would like to borrow one.

Internet

Wifi is available in each of our hosted chalets and two hotels. Please bear in mind that it may not be as quick as you are used to at home – it is only available in the communal areas, and doesn’t often reach bedrooms.

Packed Lunches

A Collett’s packed lunch is available every day to all our guests, whether you are staying in a hosted chalet, a hotel or self catering. Office Hour is a good time to place your order and your lunch will be ready to collect the following morning at 8.30am (from the chalet, at which it was ordered). A packed lunch costs €6 – this can be added to your account and paid for on the eve of your departure. See – Red File.

Supermarkets

Sport Kostner is in the centre of Corvara. Its supermarket is on the ground floor. Guests staying in Badia have a Spar at the top end of town. There is also a much larger Spar, as well as Sport Tony in the centre of La Villa, the village between Corvara and Badia.

Other Info. & Local A-Z
Dolomites Handbook Information

Local A-Z

Here is some local information in an A-Z format that will hopefully whet the appetite and help you hit the ground running.
Click here to print this page as a PDF.

Activities

See – Guides & Other Activities.

Alta Badia

Our base in the South Tyrol. It is the top end of the Val Badia comprised of six small mountain resorts. An enchanting valley surrounded by awesome peaks and strewn with Tyrolean hamlets. The valley rises southwards from the town of Brunico. Its principal village is Corvara and it is also home to five other villages. It is an excellent location for a wide range of high, medium and low level walks and bike rides. The Alta Badia is one of four valleys which terminate at the Sella Massif. It was part of Austria until 1918 and retains a Germanic character. German, Italian and Ladin are spoken. Many of our organised walks take place in and around the Alta Badia. It has an enlightened – yet reassuringly conservative and environmental – approach to tourism.

Austrian Double/Twin Bed

Austrian double beds are very common in most of our properties and throughout this part of the world. They comprise two single mattresses and two single duvets on a double bed frame, which can sometimes (but not always) be separated.

Badia

Also known as Pedraces, Collett’s has been in Badia since 1999. It is an authentic alpine village, and home to Chalet Haus Valentin, Hotel Melodia and a range of self catering apartments. The Santa Croce chairlift is a ‘must’, regardless of where you choose to stay – an enchanting ride over flower pastures and traditional farmsteads, which opens up walks of all grades. At the top you can drop in on Rifugio Nagler (run by our good friends Roberto & Giusi) for a drink or some superb food. A glorious spot!

Bakers

There are bakers in both Badia and Corvara. They open each morning (Monday-Saturday). In peak season they also open again in the afternoons and on Sunday mornings. Alternatively, bread can be bought from Sport Kostner in Corvara, or from the Spar mini-market in San Leonardo – a ten minute walk from the centre of Badia.

Banks

There are two banks in both Corvara and Badia ‐ both have cashpoints. Opening times (approx): Mon‐Fri, 8am ‐ 12pm & 3pm ‐4.15pm.

Bolzano

Bozen in German – Provincial capital of South Tyrol. A pleasant 90 minute drive from Corvara. A beautiful mountain city with porticoed streets, great shops and a colourful market. Home of the Iceman at the fascinating Museum of Archaeology (closed on Mondays) – good option for a rainy day.

Bikes & Cycling

Mountain and road bikes are available to hire locally. The Alta Badia is an increasingly high-profile destination for road and mountain biking. We have details of some bike routes in our Ideas & Information Files, but more info and maps are available from local Tourist Offices. Bikes can be taken on most of the cable cars and chairlifts without extra charge. Approx. cost of bike and helmet hire is €25 – €30 depending on spec etc. See – Organised Walks & Cycle Tours.

Breakfast

In our hosted chalets, breakfast is continental and served between 7.45 and 9am. There is tea, coffee, juices, cereals, ham, cheese, yoghurt, fruit, bread, jams and eggs. We are around to keep the buffet stocked, but it is generally a self-service system. In the Hotel Panorama and Hotel Melodia, there is a mix of self-service buffet and waiter/waitress service, plus menu choices that one expects from a good hotel.

Brunico

Bruneck in German – gateway to the Alta Badia (or Val Badia). This is an attractive fortified Tyrolean town, which sits at the northern end of the valley. There are good bus connections to and from Badia and Corvara and there are train connections to Bolzano and the mainline between Munich, Innsbruck and Verona.

Buses

Corvara and Badia are well served by local bus services ‐ especially in high season. You can travel up and down the valley easily, whilst in high season you can also access adjoining valleys, which is ideal for walks and other itineraries. Services are, however, more limited during early June and late September.

Butcher

There is a butcher in Corvara, but not in Badia (the nearest one to Badia is 2km away in La Villa). Some frozen and sometimes even fresh meat is stocked at the mini‐markets of both villages.

Cable Cars, Chairlifts & the Alta Badia Summer Pass

Cable cars and chairlifts take you to magnificent viewing points, usually with somewhere to have a drink or a meal, as well as the starting points of some wonderful walks. Dates and times of opening vary. The Alta Badia Summer Pass may be of interest ‐ a weekly pass which allows you to use 14 lifts in the Alta Badia as often as you wish during 5 days of the week, as well as discounts on some of the local facilities. For adults the pass costs €65 per week, and for children under 16 it costs €46 per week.

Cafés

There are plenty of cafés in the area. A favourite in Corvara is Café Raetia ‐ a speciality tea shop which offers teas from around the world ‐ the apple strudel from here is divine! In Badia, try Café Ricky in the centre with its wonderful cakes, pastries, homemade biscuits and chocolates.

Campolongo Pass

This is the southern point of entry into the Alta Badia, lying between Arabba & Corvara. It is the lowest of the renowned Four Passes at 1875m (See – Four Passes).

Canazei

An attractive town on the west side of Pordoi Pass in the Val Di Fassa. It has many shops, an attractive piazza, an olympic size indoor swimming pool and ice skating.

Canyoning

See – Guides & Activities.

Cars, Driving & Breakdown Service

By law, you should always drive with dipped headlights in Italy. Call 116 for the emergency breakdown service. Fly-drivers will find the Emergency Assistance Number within the car hire documentation. Your car hire supplier should arrange for the car to be repaired and/or replaced. Self-drivers are likely to drive through Austria to the Dolomites, so remember that toll stickers need to be purchased and displayed for the Austrian motorways. These are available at service stations approaching Austria and in Austria itself (€8.80 for a 10 day period, €25.70 for 2 months). In addition, just south of Innsbruck, there is a toll to pay at the Brenner Pass (€9). There is also a small toll (approx. €2.60) for the short stretch of Italian motorway that takes you towards the Dolomites. If driving to us from Venice or Treviso, you will pay a motorway toll of approx. €8.

Chalets

Our Chalets are a ‘home from home’ with a big dose of hospitality thrown in by us. Our chalet hosts will make you welcome and comfortable and, backed up by the rest of our resort team, they will be a good source of local knowledge and ideas. A semi‐continental breakfast and an excellent three course dinner are taken around a large table, which is indicative of the convivial nature of a chalet holiday. Guests are welcome in the chalet during the day and you can help yourselves to complimentary tea and coffee or to a drink from the bar. Packed lunches are available daily and charged locally.

Chemist

Farmacia in Italian and Apotheke in German, indicated by a green cross. In Corvara the chemist is diagonally opposite Sport Kostner at the top end of the village. Badia’s nearest chemist is in La Villa (2 km) on the main street at the north end of the village.

Church

Times for Holy Mass in 2018 were as follows ‐ Corvara ‐ Sunday ‐ 10.00 & 18.00 / Badia ‐ Sunday ‐ 9.00 & 17.30

Coeliacs

See – Dietary Requirements.

Cortina

Known as the Pearl of the Dolomites, this is an Olympic town in a magnificent mountain location. It is a stunning 45 minute drive from Corvara and Badia. Great for window-shopping – but it can be very quiet in low season.

Corvara

Corvara is the principal village of the Val Badia, and home to Chalet Angelo, Chalet Roch, the Hotel Panorama and a range of our self catering apartments. Corvara has two gondolas, one to the Pralongia Plateau at 1980m for easier and moderate walks, the other to the eastern turrets of the Sella at 2152m for amazing high level walks and also two Via Ferrata. Corvara is our main base in the Val Badia, and has a range of shops, cafes and many sports facilities including skating, a swimming lake, climbing wall, golf, tennis and archery etc.

Day Off

We have our local day-off on a Wednesday. In our hosted chalets, breakfast is served but dinner is not included as a part of your half-board stay. Most guests use Wednesday as an opportunity to eat out locally. There are no organised walks and there is no Office Hour. You can subscribe to Thursday’s organised walks on Tuesday evening. If you are arriving on a Wednesday, there will be somebody around to meet you, settle you in, recommend somewhere to eat and pass on the walking options for the following day.

Dietary Requirements

We need to know of any dietary requirements at least 7 days before your holiday. Please contact us now if you have not informed us if you, or any of your party, are vegetarian, vegan or coeliac etc. Thank you.

Dinner

In our chalets, we serve dinner each evening except Wednesday. Guests sit together over a three course meal where wine is complimentary. On Wednesdays, dinner is not provided as part of your half-board holiday and you can use this as an opportunity to eat out locally. Dinner times as follows: Roch & Angelo ‐ 7.30pm. Haus Valentin ‐ 7pm.
If you are staying in an hotel, dinner is available to you every evening until about 9pm.
If self-catering, you are welcome to join us for dinner in one of our chalets as long as we have space around the table, but please give us 24 hours notice. Dinner is charged locally at €20 per person.

Disclaimer & At Your Own Risk

During your stay, please always bear in mind that you are responsible for your own safety. You join organised walks at your own risk as part of an autonomous group, in which each member has a duty of care to each other. Similarly, we cannot be held responsible for the opinions and information we offer for self-guiding. In an age of litigation, we repeat the ‘at your own’ risk message at the start of each organised walk and it can become repetitive, but the message is too important.

Doctor

Call 118 for all medical emergencies and a paramedic ambulance. See – Emergency. Remember your EHIC card.

Guest Doctor San Cassiano: +39 347 4798885 ‐ Dott. Spies
Corvara Doctor: +39 0471 839189 / 337 616080 (mobile) ‐ Dott. Caretta
La Villa Doctor: +39 0471 847420 ‐ Dott. Spechtenhauser
If you need to see a doctor, please come and see us and we will be happy to help.

Dolomites

The name comes from the French geologist, Deodat‐Guy‐Sylvain‐Tancre de Gratet de Dolomieu (!), who visited the area in 1789. He was fascinated by the area’s carbonate rock, made up of stratified calcium magnesium carbonate and purer limestone.

Emergency

Call 118 for all emergencies. Alpine Rescue: 118 / Fire:115 / Police:112

Enrosadira

The coral in Dolomitic rock reflects the sun as it is setting, creating a deep rose‐pink glow on the rock face. This glorious phenomenon is known locally as Enrosadira. It is at its best in September, when it really seems as if the mountain is on fire! Chalet Haus Valentin in Badia is an unbeatable vantage point from which it can be appreciated.

Falzarego Pass

Half-way to Cortina, this is one of the area’s most significant places for recognising the military confrontation during World War I. It is rife with caves, trenches and tunnels (including the Lagazuoi Tunnels). The Lagazuoi Cable Car, open from May to October, takes you direct to Rifugio Lagazuoi, with a great 360° panoramic view. There are some outstanding high level walks and Via Ferrata that start from the Falzarego Pass.

Fauna

The wildlife of the Dolomites makes its home chiefly in the natural parks, remote valleys and high recesses of the mountains. Many native animals remain common, among these are marmots, chamois, large deer and capriolo (the small roe deer) or you might be lucky enough to spot a stambecco (a large wild mountain goat). A rich variety of birds can also be seen: the magnificent golden eagles often soar among the highest peaks; grouse seek the protective cover of forests; the white ptarmigan (which turns brown in summer) and ravens can be found in higher open areas and, of course, the alpine choughs will always be around, notably at lunch time!

Flora & Flower Walks

The Dolomites offers you some of the best alpine floral sites in Europe – if you are a keen or casual botanist, prepare to be impressed! Wildflower walks take place 5 days a week (not Wednesday or Saturday) from early June to the end of July. The walk programme is created at the discretion of our resident flower enthusiasts. If you want to join a wildflower walk, please come to Office Hour to find out more. Once a week there is also a presentation, usually with slides ‐ and not necessarily specific to the Dolomites. See – Mountain Flowers of the Dolomites.

Four Passes

Summer’s Sella Ronda! – A famous and breathtaking drive which goes all the way round the Sella massif via the four passes of Pordoi (2239m), Sella (2244m), Gardena (2121m) and Campolongo (1875m). If you have your own transport try doing this drive during the early part of your stay, as it will help you orientate yourself and get a feel for the geography of the area.

Gardena Pass, 2221m

Located above Corvara, the Gardena Pass joins the Alta Badia with the Val Gardena. It is the starting point of several good walks and also the Cirspitze, a Via Ferrata we recommend as a good introduction for the uninitiated.

Golf

There is a 9 hole course near the Campolongo Pass. It claims to be the second highest golf course in Europe and offers wonderful backdrops. It opens in late June and 18 holes will cost approx. €50.00. Clubs can be hired.

Geography & Geology – UNESCO World Heritage Site

The Italian Dolomites cover an area of more than 90km (north‐south) by 100km (west‐east). They are at an approximate latitude of 46.30° north (about the same as Zermatt) and between 11° and 12° longitude east (about the same as Munich, Venice, Rome & Innsbruck). The Dolomites consist of more than 14 mountain massifs, each with at least one 3000m peak. The fantastic scenery of the Dolomites is a result of their geology with its unique combination of two different rock types, dolomitic and volcanic. They were granted UNESCO World Heritage status in 2009.

Glacier Treks & Summit Ascents

Guided treks and summit excursions are available on the Marmolada with the local Alpine Guides. They are based in Corvara, but you can contact them to book in advance – www.altabadiaguides.com

GPS

The latest editions of the Tabacco 1:25,000 series of maps show grid references ‐ for GPS users, these coordinates relate to Rome 1940 with UTM setting.

Guides & Other Activities

If you would like to book a mountain guide or bike guide, or book any other activity such as horse riding, paragliding, canyoning, whitewater rafting etc, just ask and we will help. Ideally you will need your own transport to partake in certain activities. For example, the whitewater rafting and canyoning centre is a 50 minute drive from us. Please note: such excursions and activities are neither run nor controlled by Collett’s (even if advertised by us); that we only act as your agent; and that your contract for these services is with the third party supplier in question and not Collett’s Limited. Consequently, we are not responsible/liable for the provision of any such third party excursions or activities or for anything that happens during the course of its provision by the supplier.

Hairdryers

Hairdryers are provided in all of our hosted chalets. We have further hairdryers available for guests staying in self catering apartments – just ask if you would like to borrow one.

Half Board

In our hosted chalets, half‐board accommodation includes, bed, breakfast and evening meal (except Wednesday evening). In our hotels, it is the same, although dinner is provided every night. Packed lunches can be ordered daily through Collett’s and paid for at the end of your stay.

Horseriding

Horseriding is available in Badia, San Cassiano and also a little further afield at the Sitting Bull Ranch at Longiarù about 25 minutes drive from Badia. Rides or lessons can be booked in resort. Just ask.

Hospitals/Medical Centres

If it arises that you have to go to hospital/medical centre unaccompanied by us, here are details of those nearest to us.
Corvara Medical Centre – just off the main street behind the band stand. There is an x‐ray facility, so here might be a good start.

Brunico Hospital – if you are in Badia or Corvara, go to Brunico at the bottom (northern) end of the Val Badia. On entering Brunico, turn left at the first roundabout (after the Shell garage and signed to Ahrntal). Follow this road for about 2kms before turning right over a bridge – the hospital is signed to the right about 1km down this road. Tel. 0474 555444 or 0474 581111.
Agordo Hospital – if you are near Arabba & the Marmolada (south of the Alta Badia) it might be better to go to Agordo (45 minutes away) by following signs to Belluno. In Agordo, turn left just after the big church in the main piazza and follow the road for half a mile. For casualty, follow the sign to PRONTO SOCCORSO. Tel 0437 645111 or 0437 62870

Ideas & Information Files

Our Ideas & Information Files contain suggestions for many outstanding walks of all grades and other days out. Copies are available at Office Hour. You can browse the files for itineraries and ideas. You can also borrow a copy of any of the featured walks in the form of a Route Laminate for use the following day.

Ice Skating

Available at the ice rink in Corvara during high season.

Iceman

The Iceman put Bolzano on the world map. You can see his almost perfectly preserved body of 5300 years at the Museum of Archaeology at the heart of this beautiful mountain city. The museum is closed on Mondays.

Innsbruck

Innsbruck is a feasible day trip from the Dolomites and it takes a little over two hours to get there. It is a scenic mountain drive. Consider Bolzano first though ‐ it’s nearer, similar and arguably just as attractive.

Internet

Wifi is available in each of our hosted chalets and two hotels. Please bear in mind that it may not be as quick as you are used to at home – it is only available in the communal areas, and doesn’t often reach bedrooms.

Kettles

Electric kettles are rare items in Italy! It is against Italian Law to have them in hotel rooms and other licensed guest accommodation. Italians use stove top coffee makers in general and do not drink tea like the British do!

Ladin

Describes dialect, culture and people of the wider local area.

Lagazuoi Tunnels and Austrian Troop Path

A labyrinth of WWI tunnels built in the mountain above the Falzarego Pass. The tunnels are accessed by the Lagazuoi cablecar, and maps are available from a kiosk by the cable car station. The tunnels are quite an adventure and not for the faint‐hearted. They bring to life the incredible conditions in which the Austrians and Italians fought for key positions in the tragic mountain conflicts of WW1. Helmet and torches are essential for the tunnels. Please consider bringing a torch from home, as these are only usually available for hire during high season (from a kiosk at the Lagazuoi cable car station) and are in short supply. The tunnels are good for a rainy day (although it can get slippery underfoot). In addition, an Austrian troop path has recently been re‐opened. It is not for the faint-hearted either and has some exposed (albeit protected) sections.

Latitudes & Longitudes

Corvara: Lat. 46° 32’ N ‐ Long. 11° 52’ E Badia: Lat. 46° 31′ N ‐ Long. 11° 53′ E

Laundry

We are slightly limited on washing machines, but if you really need to do some laundry during your stay, please ask. There is a charge per load of washing.

La Villa

Situated half way between the villages of Corvara and Badia, La Villa is where you turn off if you are heading to San Cassiano and the Falzerego Pass for the Lagazuoi tunnels. It has a range of shops and cafes, and can easily be reached via the riverside paths from both Corvara and Badia.

Low Season

In late May, early/mid June or late‐ish September the area will be fairly quiet and certain shops and services are closed. The walking is good though and these are lovely periods to be in the area. We run a full programme of organised walks, cycle tours, painting etc. from the beginning to the end of our season – with the exception of flower walks, which are only offered in June and July.

Magnetic Variation

We rarely use compasses here because the terrain is a paradise of dramatic features. However, magnetic variation is quite minimal (around one degree west) and is not generally referred to on maps. We have noticed that in some areas the compass displays some strange inaccuracies, due to either the magnetic properties of volcanic rock, or buried metal from wartime remains.
Marmolada, 3343m ‐ Queen of the Dolomites

The highest mountain in the Dolomites and home to the only glacier in the range. You can get to the top by using the three stage cable car at Malga Ciapela (open from mid‐June to late Sept.) or you can take the bucket lift on the other side of Lake Fedaia, accessed by crossing the spectacular dam at the west end of the lake. This will take you to the snout of the glacier, close to two rifugios. (See – Glacier Treks & Summit Ascents).

Mountain Flowers of the Dolomites

The perfect book for the casual botanist! A user-friendly ‘must’ for anyone with an interest in the exceptional flora of the Dolomites. It was written by two of our own flower specialists, Cliff Booker and David Charlton. Contact us now for a copy and gen up before you go. £9.95 plus £1.65 UK P&P.

Mountain Rescue

Call 118.

Mountain Safety

Remember you join our walks and cycle tours at your own risk. You can read about our walks procedures and refresh your mountain safety in the Procedures & Safety tab.

Office Hour & Planning Your Days

A popular Collett’s institution, which is far more informal than its name suggests. Over maps and a relaxing pre-dinner drink, you can chat with our own walkers and plan your days, obtaining information on walks, whether you self-guide or opt for one of our organised walks. You can also chat about Via Ferrata, flower walks, painting, cycling and more. Moreover, we can help you book locally-supplied alpine activities. Office Hour is held every evening (except Wednesday) from 6pm in chalets Roch, Angelo and Haus Valentin. If you are a hotel or self-catering guest, just walk to your nearest Office Hour and you will be made welcome. Many guests come simply to enjoy a relaxing pre-dinner drink in the good company of other guests.

Organised Walks & Cycle Tours

At Office Hour you will find out about the organised walks and cycle tours taking place the following day. You will find out when and where you need to meet up with our organiser and other participants. Remember you join an organised walk at your own risk, so please make it your business to study the walk before you choose to join it. Our team can help you do this at Office Hour, using maps and their own knowledge. Also, please come to the meeting place with everything you need for the walk – See Walker’s Checklist. There are no organised walks on our day-off, Wednesday. Organised walks are only cancelled when they are considered potentially dangerous due to bad weather.

Packed Lunches

A Collett’s packed lunch is available every day to all our guests, whether you are staying in a hosted chalet, a hotel or self catering. Office Hour is a good time to place your order and your lunch will be ready to collect the following morning at 8.30am (from the chalet, at which it was ordered). A packed lunch costs €6 – this can be added to your account and paid for on the eve of your departure. See – Red File.

Packing Suggestions

See – Inside back cover of this booklet.

Painting Strolls

Informal painting tuition is available 2 days a week – Mondays and Fridays. Armed with a packed lunch and some watercolours, we usually take a short walk to a nice location. Here we while away a few hours painting under the casual guidance of our artist. Group sizes are usually just 3 or 4 people, rarely more than 6. We try to keep the groups quite small and if they do become oversubscribed, we might ask people to book in for another day. We provide painting materials for the occasional painter but if you intend to paint regularly, we would ask you to bring your own materials.

Paragliding

Tandem paragliding is available in Corvara. We can book this for you or you can go directly to the hut situated in the field below the Boé Gondola in Corvara, which is also the meeting point. Rough price ‐ €115 inc. souvenir t‐shirt.

Petrol & Diesel

Petrol stations can be found in the villages of Badia and La Villa. There is also one just outside Corvara en-route to Colfosco.

Police

Call 112 for emergencies, for Corvara Police call 0471 836063 and for Badia Police call 0471 847123.

Pordoi Pass, 2239m

Located above Arabba, the Pordoi Pass forms the border between Veneto and Trentino and is a wildflower ‘mecca’. Close to its souvenir shops, you will find the starting point of the spectacular Sass Pordoi cable car to the summit plateau of the Sella Massif. It also provides access to one of the area’s most beautiful walks – the Viel del Pan or Bindelweg. It is also an easy stroll out to the German War Mausoleum.

Rainy Days

Hopefully there won’t be any! If you are unlucky, please bear in mind that the weather in the mountains can be very localised and it is not unusual to leave the village on a rainy day to find brighter conditions in a neighbouring valley. Suggestions for rainy days are available in our Ideas & Information Files or simply ask us for inspiration.

Red File

In our hosted chalets, each of our guests has a bar tab which we refer to as the Red File, where you enter any drinks or snacks taken from the chalet’s bar. We will enter any packed lunches you order. You can settle up with us in cash or with a card. Card payments are processed in Euros. Local self catering and hotel guests also have a page in the Red File, as they might want to put Office Hour drinks, packed lunches etc. on account during their stay. We ask you to settle your Red File account on the eve of your departure.

Restaurants

It is easy to find good restaurants and pizzerias in the Alta Badia. The valley is justifiably proud of its excellent gastronomic reputation. Prices are reasonable and the food is often exceptional. If you want to go upmarket and stylish, there are several options where you can treat yourselves to something really special. For something different, there are also places which concentrate on traditional Ladin cuisine. Guests staying in our hosted chalets on a half-board basis will need to find a restaurant on our day off (Wednesday) when we do not serve dinner. If invited to do so, we will be happy to recommend and (if necessary) book somewhere appropriate for you.

Rifugios – Mountain Huts

These are a key attraction of walking in the Dolomites. They offer well‐earned refreshment and wonderful vistas from their sun terraces! Huts are strewn all over the Dolomites, often at trail intersections. It is not unusual for us to drop into a hut on our organised walks – we have our favourites! Most of them are not really huts – they are more substantial, like inns or hostelries. Some are more comprehensive than others in what they offer, but you can generally rely on a warm welcome, excellent service, good food and drink at reasonable prices. If you like the idea of an overnight stay in one of the huts, visit colletts.co.uk/hut

Route Laminates

These are laminated copies of the walks, Via Ferrata, bike routes, scenic drives and days out featured in our Ideas & Information Files. They are available for you to borrow at Office Hour. Please return them soon after your walk. You must not use the Route Laminates as definitive walking guides. They are for reference only, as the maps they contain are not necessarily to scale. You should mark up your own map accordingly to determine independently whether the itinerary is suitable for you and your party. You borrow Route Laminates at your own risk. Remember that terrain and route conditions can change at any time, rendering any map or itinerary description outdated.

Sass Pordoi Cable Car

A thrilling cable car ride to the ‘top of the world,’ which ascends at 8m per second from the Pordoi Pass to the summit plateau of the Sella massif. In under 2 minutes you rise 711m to an altitude of 2950m. Open from late May/early June to October.

Self Catering

Whilst generally well-equipped, our self-catering apartments do not normally have ovens. Most have hobs, supplemented by a microwave. We provide bed linen and a small welcome pack. Contact us now if you would like to book towels, although these are provided in Superior Self Catering Apartments (See – Towels & Bed Linen). You are also welcome to book in for dinner at one of our chalets during your stay, subject to availability and paying locally at €20 per person. Both Corvara and Badia have mini‐markets stocking most essentials. Consider dropping into a supermarket on your way to the Dolomites, especially if arriving on a low season weekend. If travelling up from Venice or Treviso, there are out‐of‐town hypermarkets on your right as you drive into Belluno ‐ look out for Emisfero. Guests travelling from the north may want to head into Brunico. There is a supermarket called Supertip Spar as you enter the town.

Slippers

Some floors in our chalets and apartments are either tiled or wooden, so you may wish to pack a pair of slippers to wear around the chalet. Please remove walking boots before entering the chalets and apartments. Thank you.

Smoking

Since 2005, smoking in public buildings has been illegal in Italy. All chalets and self catering apartments are no‐smoking.

Sport Kostner

A large supermarket and outdoor shop in Corvara, which hires out Via Ferrata kit. Collett’s guests get 10% discount in the sports department.

Sun Protection

At higher altitudes the sun is much more intense and can easily cause sunburn, even when it appears to be a cloudy day. It also reflects off the light coloured rock of the Dolomites, so a high factor cream is recommended.

Supermarkets

Sport Kostner is in the centre of Corvara. Its supermarket is on the ground floor. Guests staying in Badia have a Spar at the top end of town. There is also a much larger Spar, as well as Sport Tony in the centre of La Villa, the village between Corvara and Badia.

Swimming

During high season there is the outdoor swimming lake in Corvara ‐ you can sunbathe here too. There is an indoor pool at La Villa (at the Scuola Media) ‐ open Mon/Wed/Fri 14.00 to 21.00 & Tue/Thu/Sat. from 14.00 to 19.00. At Canazei, there is indoor swimming everyday (except Mon.) from mid/late June to mid September from 14.30 to 20.30.

Taxis

Taxis in this area are invariably 8 seater minibuses. Corvara ‐ try Alfred Pescosta on 0039 347 2615525(m) or Alfredo Lori on 0039 339 7969199(m). Badia ‐ try Taxi Vico on 0039 0471 847245 or 0039 335 6116528 (m).

Tea & Coffee

In our chalets, if we are not around, please help yourself to complimentary tea and coffee.

Tennis

Tennis is available at Corvara and La Villa. Bookings can be made at the courts.

Tipping

Tips are not expected in this region and should be made purely at your discretion.

Towels & Bed Linen

In chalets Angelo, Roch & Haus Valentin, we supply one bath towel and one hand towel, changed once during a stay of up to 10 days and twice for longer stays. Bed linen is only changed if you are staying for more than 10 days. For self-caterers, towels are not supplied unless pre‐booked by you through our UK Office at £6 per set. If you have booked towels, they will be in your accommodation on your arrival ‐ one bath towel and one hand towel per person. This does not apply to guests staying in the superior self-catering, where towels are provided.

Transfer Times

From Venice & Treviso the transfer time to Corvara is about 3 hours. For Badia, add 10 or 15 minutes.

Treviso

A beautiful mediaeval city with canals, cafes and piazzas. The No. 6 bus connects the airport to the train station and town centre. There is a left luggage facility opposite Treviso airport and at the railway station, where trains leave for Venice every 30 mins.

Vegans & Vegetarians

See – Dietary Requirements.

Venice

Many people add a stay here before (or after) their stay. Visit colletts.co.uk/venice for a list of recommended hotels. Waterbuses to and from the airport depart every 30 minutes – visit alilaguna.com. Purchase waterbus tickets in the airport’s arrival hall, then walk to the jetty (500m) or every 6 minutes there is a free shuttle bus from terminal entrance: Stop 1 ‐ Hire Car Parks. Stop 2 ‐ Waterbus Jetty.
Important Information if you are meeting an Airport Transfer: buy a return ticket; on arriving at St. Mark’s Square, take the time to find the right jetty for your trip back to the airport by looking for ALILAGUNA signs – and establish departure times, remembering that the journey back to the airport takes 65 mins. Buses are operated by ATVO and leave the airport for Piazzale Roma on the Grand Canal every 30mins. This journey takes 25 minutes and is much cheaper than the waterbus. See atvo.it for timetables etc. For more information, see veniceairport.com. A Left Luggage kiosk is on the ground floor of the airport, charging €4.50 per item, open until 9pm.

Via Ferrata

A significant attraction of the Dolomites, Via Ferrata gives you the opportunity to explore the massifs on a system of cables, ladders, tunnels and gorge-spanning bridges. This is the birthplace of Via Ferrata and we are at the heart of the greatest concentration of Via Ferrata in the world, many of which are detailed in our Ideas & Information Files so that – if you have the relevant experience – you can embark on the routes of your choice. Our resort team includes people who are dedicated to helping anyone with an interest in Via Ferrata. They can chat with you about local routes, help you hire equipment locally and, if required, they will book a guide for you. (See – Glacier Treks & Summit Ascents for details of our weekly organised Via Ferrata excursion to the summit of the Marmolada).

Walker’s Checklist

When walking in the mountains, we recommend you take the following in your rucksack: Waterproof jacket, extra layers for cold weather, water (at least 2 litres), sunglasses, sun hat and sun cream, food, map and compass, money (for chairlifts/drinks/snacks etc), and your mobile phone!

Water

Tap water in this area is drinkable. Pack a water container and take plenty of water with you when out. Two litres is recommended.

Weather Tips & Climate

Please don’t ring us to find out what the weather will be like during your holiday! We would hate to get it wrong and with mountains it is hard to get it right! Generally, the prevailing weather in the Dolomites during the summer is good, but as in any mountainous areas, the weather can be unpredictable and localised. Weather info is available at www.provinz.bz.it/wetter or www.arpa.veneto.it
As for temperatures, June and September can sometimes be quite chilly at night (down to 5°celcius) whilst it can go up to 30°celcius during the day, although the average would be nearer 20°celcius. An up‐to‐date forecast will be available at Office Hour each evening and at the local tourist offices. Naturally, our hosts keep a firm eye on weather conditions and try to ensure it is safe to proceed with an excursion, but it is everybody’s responsibility to consider cancelling an excursion (and to voice any anxiety) if worried about the risk of adverse weather conditions.

Whitewater Rafting

See – Guides & Activities.

World War I Walks

The scale of the conflict in the Dolomites is surprising. It began in the Dolomites because the border between Italy and Austria ran through the mountains. From 1915 to 1917, the two countries fought a war of fixed positions and the frontline barely moved. Both sides were ingenious in establishing their positions, they built trenches, observation posts and miles of tunnels, often sleeping within earshot of the enemy. The winter of 1916 saw 10m of snowfall and more than 10,000 men died in avalanches. On the Marmolada, 400 died in a single avalanche. Neither side won this tragic conflict and the destiny of the area was decided at the Treaty of Saint Germain in 1919 in Paris. If WWI is of interest to you, you can visit the open‐air museum at Lagazuoi & Cinque Torre near the Falzarego Pass. You can walk in trenches, on old troop paths and visit the Lagazuoi tunnels.
From 11th August to 10th September, John Scanlon, a previous guest of Collett’s with a profound interest in and knowledge of WWI, will be offering a weekly programme of walks specifically relating to areas of WWI interest. He will also give an occasional presentation in one of our hosted chalets in the evening. There is no charge to join John’s walks. For more information see colletts.co.uk/war‐walks

Travel & Directions
Dolomites Handbook Information

Click here to print detailed directions and maps as a PDF

Click here to print this page as a PDF.
Click here to print directions to the Dolomites as a PDF.

Before leaving home

Passport – Is it in date? Contact the passport office here if you need to renew your passport
Walking Holiday Insurance – Do you have any? Contact us on 01799 513331 or click here for details
Flight Check-in – Remember to print off your boarding pass
Baggage – Have you checked the size & weight of your baggage?
Book Airport Hotel – Click here
Book Airport Parking – Click here

Transfers & Arrival Day

If you have booked an Airport Transfer, you will be met by a member of our staff at the airport at a pre-arranged time. Details of transfer times are posted by Dee Collett in the form of a letter to the person who booked the holiday.

At Venice Marco Polo & Treviso Airports, we meet by the café in the Arrivals Hall – Transfer Time: 3½hrs.

Important Notes concerning Collett’s Transfers We try to keep ‘waiting at the airport’ to a minimum, but you have booked a transfer on the understanding that it is a possibility on both your day of arrival and departure. We are not offering a personal taxi service. Our transfer times are set to help us group people together from a number of different flights, both morning and afternoon. Waiting may also be caused by delayed flights – within reason. Please cancel your airport transfer and make your own plans if you are not happy with these arrangements, which by and large work very well.

On arrival in the Dolomites you will be welcomed and settled in. We place the emphasis on getting you settled in, relaxed (with a drink) and well fed, given access to relevent information regarding the next day’s itineraries.

Fly Drivers and Self Drivers

Hiring a car? Make sure you print your DVLA Licence Check Code – Click here for our information on what you need to do.
Driving Directions – Click here.
Guidelines on driving in Europe – Visit theaa.com

If you are self driving or hiring a car please print and refer to our Driving Directions here. If you have any questions about driving on the continent, please give us a call on 01799 513331.

Also, we would be grateful if you could let us know your estimated time of arrival in resort. Click here to submit your E.T.A.

Badia – All guests (whether staying in the Hotel Melodia or an apartment) should make their way to the Chalet Haus Valentin.
Corvara – All guests staying in Chalet Angelo or the Hotel Panorama should head to Chalet Angelo to check in, and guests staying at Chalet Roch or any other accommodation in Corvara should meet our staff at Chalet Roch.

Address for Sat Navs:

Chalet Haus Valentin
Via Runcac 35, I-39036 Badia
0039 0471 839687
www.bit.ly/Directions-to-Valentin for directions to Chalet Haus Valentin in Badia

Chalet Roch
Strada Parüs 1, I-39033 Corvara
0039 0471 836204
www.bit.ly/Directions-to-Roch for directions to Chalet Roch in Corvara

Chalet Angelo
Strada Sciuz 5, I-39033 Corvara
0039 0471 835738
https://www.bit.ly/Directions-to-Angelo for directions to Chalet Angelo in Corvara

Collett’s Mountain Holidays UK: 0044 (0)1799 513331
(9am-6pm, Monday-Friday only)

Resort Contacts

Contact Numbers and Addresses

Click here to print this page as a PDF.
Please ensure you have the following telephone numbers with you on your day of travel.

BadiaCorvara
Collett's Mountain Holidays
Chalet Haus Valentin
Via Runcac 35
39036 Badia (BZ)
ITALIA
Google Map Link
0039 0471 839687
Collett's Mountain Holidays
Chalet Angelo
Via Sciuz 5
39033 Corvara in Badia (BZ)
ITALIA
Google Map Link
0039 0471 836765
Collett's Mountain Holidays
Chalet Roch
Strada Parüs, 1
39033 Corvara in Badia (BZ)
ITALIA
Google Map Link
0039 0471 836204
Hut to Hut Emergency contact - 0044 7403 998 511
Dolomites Resort Manager - 0044 7426 264 289 / 0039 3478 212 648
Collett's Mountain Holidays UK - 0044 (0) 1799 513331 Monday - Friday 9am-6pm / Saturday 9am-3pm
(Outside of these hours please call your chalet or the resort manager - thank you)

Disclaimer
Dolomites Handbook Information

Important – Disclaimer

On arrival, you will be asked to hand in the disclaimer sent by post.
This should be signed by all members of the party. This disclaimer is largely based on the ‘At your own Risk’ section in our guest information.
Download and print out the disclaimer here to sign and take with you

On arrival, you will be asked to hand in the disclaimer sent by post to the person who booked the holiday. In this age of litigation, it is important that you understand your relationship with Collett’s Ltd. when joining our organised walks or using our information to self-guide.
1. The disclaimer below sets out this relationship, emphasising that we are not qualified guides and that you join our organised walks at your own risk as a member of a group in which each member has a duty of care to the other. See more detailed notes in our brochure on Page 81.
2. Ideally it will be signed by each member of your party and handed to us on your arrival. If you require more copies, click here to print it as a PDF.

Copy of our Disclaimer – for your reference

Party Name:
Mobile Phone No:

Everything you do during your stay in Austria is done ‘at your own risk’.
To make your arrival in the Dolomites as plain sailing as possible, please could you and each member of your party read and sign this disclaimer, handing it to us on your arrival. If it is not possible to obtain all signatures prior to your holiday, signatures will need to be obtained on your party’s arrival in the Dolomites.

In these days of litigation, it is important you and your party understand your relationship with Collett’s and without your party’s signatures on this disclaimer, you will not be able to join our you will not be able to join our Organised Walks and we would be reluctant to pass on information and opinions to you during your stay.

Information & Opinions
We are happy to offer information and opinions on the area (including walks, protected paths, Via Ferrata, sport climbs, bike rides, places of interest etc). We always endeavour to give accurate and appropriate information and opinions, but we do not take any responsibility for them and they are acted upon by you at your own risk. By signing this disclaimer, you agree you do not hold Collett’s responsible for any information or opinions it offers you during your stay and that you do everything during your stay with Collett’s at your own risk.

Organised Walks and Cycles
Our Walk and Cycle Organisers attend these on a goodwill basis so that you might partake in an itinerary you might not otherwise come across during your stay in a sociable atmosphere with like-minded people.
By signing this disclaimer you confirm the following:

  • You understand the Walk Organisers are not qualified mountain guides.
  • You join them at your own risk and of your own free will.
  • You are part of an autonomous group, responsible for your own safety and happy to accept the discretion and actions of any or all participants on that Organised Walk or activity in the event of injury to you, the need to have you rescued or otherwise.
  • You will only sign up to an Organised Walk or Cycle having independently studied the route sufficiently and deemed it to be within your capability.

Transport
When joining an Organised Walk or Cycle you might be asked to drive (or accept a lift from) someone, who is not in your booking party, to and from an excursion. The system works well but by signing this disclaimer you accept that Collett’s will not accept any liability in the event of a road accident and that you enter into such an arrangement with another driver/passenger by mutual consent.

Glacier Treks, Summit Ascents & Other Activities supplied by Third Parties
We are happy to inform you of (and book) activities supplied by third parties, such as Glacier Treks and Summit Ascents, but it is important that you understand that: these excursions and activities are neither run nor controlled by Collett’s (even if advertised by us); that we only act as your agent; and that your contract for these services is with the third party supplier in question and not Collett’s Limited. Consequently, we are not responsible/liable for the provision of any such third party excursions or activities or for anything that happens during the course of its provision by the supplier. This applies to all activities advertised by Collett’s in our brochure, on our website and in resort and includes Glacier Treks and Summit Ascents. For example, in the case of Glacier Treks and Summit Ascents, as well as any Guided Via Ferrata you may book yourself whilst in the Dolomites, your contract for guiding services is directly with Alta Badia Guides and not Collett’s Limited.

Finally, during your stay, you might inadvertently (or not!) be included in photography that subsequently appears in Collett’s promotional materials. By signing this disclaimer, you agree that this is ok with you.

Signature 1 :
Print Name :
Date :

Signature 2 :
Print Name :
Date :

Signature 3 :
Print Name :
Date :

Signature 4 :
Print Name :
Date :

Thank you. Have a good and safe stay in Austria.
Collett’s Limited trading as Collett’s Mountain Holidays – 3a Market Hill, Saffron Walden, Essex, CB10 1HQ

Packing Suggestions
Dolomites Handbook Information

Checklist & Packing Suggestions

Click here to print this page as a PDF.

Essential Items

☐ Passport
☐ Euros or credit/debit cards (there are cash machines in Corvara & Badia)
☐ Holiday Insurance
☐ EHIC (European Health Insurance Card)
☐ Mobile telephone & charger
☐ Signed disclaimer
☐ Medication?

Flyers

☐ Flight tickets and/or printed boarding pass
☐ Have you checked the size & weight of your baggage?

Fly Drivers

☐ Driving licence
☐ Printed copy of driving licence ‘check code’ Visit gov.uk/view-driving-licence
☐ Car hire voucher
☐ Credit card of the lead driver
☐ Sat Nav & European road map
☐ Torch

Self Drivers

☐ Driving licence
☐ Ferry / tunnel ticket
☐ Insurance & car registration documents
☐ European breakdown cover
☐ GB Sticker (must be displayed in the EU)
☐ Warning triangle (must be carried in the EU)
☐ Fluorescent bibs (must be carried in the EU)
☐ Spare bulbs
☐ Sat Nav & European road map
☐ Torch

General

☐ Clothes, footwear & wash kit
☐ Sunglasses, sun hat & sun cream
☐ Swimming kit (outdoor pool in Corvara)
☐ Camera, memory card, batteries & charger
☐ Binoculars
☐ Pocket reference books (e.g. flowers)
☐ German/Italian phrase book
☐ Games, playing cards, books?
☐ Continental plug-adapter (European voltage for normal appliances is 220-240 Volts)
☐ A level of fitness to suit your own intentions!

For Walking

☐ Strong, light, comfortable walking boots,
which support the ankle
☐ Waterproof jacket and trousers
☐ Clothing for hot and cold weather
☐ Lightweight rucksack (25 litres plus)
☐ Telescopic walking poles
☐ Basic first-aid kit
☐ Water bottle (min. 2 litres, 3 litres is recommended for harder walks)
☐ Map case
☐ Compass, whistle, torch, survival bag

Via Ferrata

☐ Helmet
☐ Sit harness or full body harness

☐ VF Tails

Glacier Excursions

☐ Strong, comfortable walking boots, which support the ankle (low cut footwear are not suitable)
☐ Gaiters (if you have them), gloves & hat
☐ Walking trousers (not shorts) and warm layers

Painters

We keep a limited supply of watercolour paints, materials and folding stools for those wishing to have a go at painting. If you intend to paint regularly, please bring the following:
☐ Compact watercolour paints kit & palettes
☐ Watercolour blocks/pads
☐ Pencils (up to 2B) & putty rubber
☐ Craft knife or scalpel for sharpening pencils
☐ Folding/collapsible stools

To Add to Your Mobile Contacts

☐ Resort Mobiles: 0039 347 8212648 / 0044 7426 264 289
☐ Chalet Haus Valentin 0039 0471 839687
☐ Chalet Roch 0039 0471 836204
☐ Chalet Angelo 0039 0471 835738
☐ Emergency Services 118
☐ Ambulance 118
☐ Fire 115
☐ Police 112

Procedures & Safety
Andalucia Handbook Information

At Your Own Risk, Duty of Care, Procedures & Mountain Safety

Click here to print this page as a PDF.

At Your Own Risk & Duty of Care

As you will know, we offer a weekly programme of organised walks which you can join at no extra cost. Our walk organisers are not qualified guides and you join them at your own risk. Similarly, if you choose to walk independently, we cannot take responsibility for information gleaned from our Ideas & Information Files, Route Laminates and the first-hand knowledge/opinions of our own people. To this extent, it is essential that you ultimately decide independently whether any itinerary you choose to do – be it self-guided or ‘organised’ – is suitable for you and your party.

In short, everything you do during your stay in the mountains is done at your own risk. In the event of personal injury or death, we are not liable for efforts made by us to enhance your stay, amongst which are our organised walks and various printed and verbal suggestions. It is a fact that activities undertaken in the mountains are associated with personal injury and death. By coming to such an area with Collett’s Mountain Holidays – or indeed independently – you are exposing yourself and your party to the (thankfully small) possibility of personal injury or death. In such an event, Collett’s Mountain Holidays will not be held responsible for your interest in mountainous areas and your involvement in mountain pursuits, which can occasionally have tragic consequences.

We put safety first but you are as responsible as we are!

You join our organised walks as part of an autonomous group, in which each member has a duty of care to each other. Not being professionally responsible for you does not mean we turn a blind eye to safety, nor does it make us exempt from owing a duty of care to you. Your safety is essential to us and we therefore take our own safety measures, endeavouring to minimise the possibility of personal injury and death. We do this in line with legal requirements pertaining to duty of care. We assess, communicate and manage risk as part of a formal company Health & Safety Policy, which is regularly reviewed and includes the training our own walkers. We try to make people aware of the importance of mountain safety and their responsibilities as part of a group. As with any person or organisation involved with activities where there is a possibility of personal injury or death, the issue of duty of care is ever-present and, in the absence of a qualified guide in ‘non-professional’ activities anywhere in the world, such as walking (whether organised by a company, club, university or even a friend) every member of the group has a legal commitment to all involved. This commitment to your fellow walkers should form the basis of your behaviour and actions during an organised walk, especially in the event of accident or injury. Our focus on safety should not influence whether you decide to join an organised walk or not, for at the heart of our procedures are basic mountain safety measures, which should be undertaken by any walker when preparing for a day out in the mountains, especially when walking/climbing in a group, where your actions (or inaction) could compromise your safety as well as that of other people in the group.

Some notes about our Organised Walks

Our programme of organised walks is put together on a goodwill basis by our own walk organisers and we ask you to accept their discretion where the selection of walks is concerned. You won’t be disappointed. Each week the programme changes and is duly published to our guests. Everyday except on our local day-off, Wednesday – and with a reduced programme on Saturdays – we offer two different walks, one more demanding than the other. Prior to joining up to an organised walk, please remember somebody else’s opinion of a walk is their opinion, not your knowledge. Try to acquaint yourself independently with the proposed route using the relevant map to help you decide if it is suitable for your level of fitness and experience. Also, ask about precipitous features if prone to vertigo. Some walks feature ledge paths with significant drops and switchback tracks on steep slopes. Wednesday is our staff day off and there are no organised walks on this day. Our organised walks take place in a sociable and informal atmosphere and, whilst you are encouraged not to join one unless you are certain it is within your physical capabilities, we walk at the pace of the slowest person and pause regularly. You do not pay to join our organised walks and in the event of a walk organiser being ill, we cannot guarantee the excursion will take place. Children can join our organised walks but only if accompanied by a guardian, who takes full responsibility for their safety and behaviour.

With various people choosing to join various walks in various locations, you might be asked to give (or take) a lift with someone. Please do not do either unless you are happy that, in the event of an accident, Collett’s will not accept any liability. If ever taxis are used, the cost is shared across the party.

Procedures on meeting up for a walk – All organised walks will depart from outside of our chalets (unless otherwise advised) at a time established at Office Hour the night before. Prior to leaving, the walk organiser will run through an equipment checklist and at the start of the actual walk, he/she will state the following:

  • They are not qualified guides and everyone joins the Organised Walk at their own risk;
  • The party is walking as a group of non-qualified individuals and the walk organiser, as someone who knows the route, is the nominal leader only;
  • Everyone should follow the course and progress of the route on their map checking the correct route is being adhered to;
  • They will generally walk at the pace of the slowest person in the party and it is the responsibility of each member of the party to keep the rest of the group in sight;
  • If anyone wants to rest at any time, they should not hesitate to ask;
  • If anyone wants to leave the party at any time could they please let someone in the group know, otherwise we might have to assume you are lost and alert mountain rescue;
  • Everyone owes a ‘duty of care’ to each other. In the event of an accident, the organiser will act in a way they deem safest to offer assistance, but would of course appreciate the assistance of the rest of the party;
  • If it is the first time the organiser has done a route, the party understand this and it is an ‘adventure’ for all involved.

Mountain Safety & Emergency Procedures

Here are some notes that might help you refresh or improve your awareness of safety in the mountains. When in the mountains and when planning itineraries, apply your mind to safety at all times. Poor preparation is often the cause of many accidents and dramas. As a general guide to safety we have used information published by the Italian Alpine Rescue Corps and the British Mountaineering Council to produce the following notes:

Prevention Of Accidents – Basic Rules For Increased Safety In The Mountains

  • Never underestimate the dangers and the risks attached to a day out in the mountains – hostile environments, rapid changes in weather conditions, etc.
  • Select itineraries within your level of fitness and technical/physical ability and within those of your party members.
  • Do not go alone – if possible, go with others or, for more safety, go in the company of an alpine guide or a qualified organisation. (Collett’s is not a qualified organisation but we will endeavour to arrange local guides if requested to do so). Prior to departing, research and familiarise yourself adequately with the characteristics and difficulties of the itinerary. Study carefully the relevant topographical map.
  • Let someone know where you are going and leave details of your itinerary. (Do not change your itinerary without informing somebody).
  • Have a contingency plan in the event of the unexpected. An innacurate or out of date map, route deterioration or a landslide, could all cause a change in your itinerary.
  • Mountain Weather conditions should always be taken into account. A forecast is available from local tourist offices every day and whilst variations in mountain forecasts are not uncommon, they are worth consulting.
  • Have the right clothing. You should have a robust pair of walking boots/shoes, which support the ankle. Take a waterproof/wind-proof jacket and some spare clothes in your rucksack.
  • Be responsible. Always carry the relevant map at all times. Carry safety equipment such as a compass, torch, whistle, spare food and an understanding of how to use them in case of emergency. If you have a health condition, please ensure that you carry any necessary medication at all times, and inform another member of your party so that somebody is aware of your circumstances.
  • Have adequate insurance cover. Don’t leave home without it, you can’t take out insurance after you departure!

Some Points Specific To Mountainous Areas

  • Avalanches – residual snow and early snow falls, coupled with high summer temperatures can lead to the risk of avalanche. Avoid walking on steep sided, snow covered slopes.
  • Lightning – thunderstorms are a feature of mountain weather. If lightning is close, avoid any cables, summits, ridges, trees and caves. There are various opinions as to the best course of action in this event, but it is probably safest to sit the storm out on a rucksack in open ground.
  • Residual Snow – in early-mid summer be aware of residual snow on some trails. Late lying snow can be treacherous underfoot, and if you slip it may be difficult to stop. There may also be hidden hazards underneath (ditches, streams etc). If you are concerned, talk to members of your party and if appropriate, consider walking around these areas. If you are thinking about crossing any snow, always ascertain, as far as possible, what risks are involved and only cross if you think it is safe to do so.
  • Rock Falls – due to the easily fractured nature of limestone, loose rocks and rock fall are a significant feature of the mountains. Take care when walking near the base of cliffs, and consider taking a climbing helmet if planning a long walk in such areas. Be careful not to dislodge loose rocks yourself, as there may be other people below you. Warn other if you dislodge a rock. In English the usual shouted warning is ‘Below!’, but in Spain you should shout ‘Piedra!’.
  • Steep, loose paths – many of the waymarked routes in the area include sections of steep, rocky track, often loose under foot. Walking poles are widely recognised as being helpful on such terrain. Check the gradient of any paths you are unsure of using a map and looking at the contour intervals (there is a contour interval of 25 metres on the 1:25,000 scale Tabacco and Kompass maps). If faced with exceptionally steep ground, the general rule to remember is not to go up if you don’t think you can come back down.
  • Vertigo – many of the routes in the area include paths that traverse steep sided sections of mountainside. If you suffer from vertigo then sections like this can give you a sense of exposure. Plan your walks carefully.

Emergency Procedures

Based on information published by the Italian Alpine Rescue Corps and the British Mountaineering Council – for anyone wishing to take the following emergency notes with them on an itinerary, a printed copy is available:

  • Stay calm and do not do anything on impulse.
  • Evaluate the situation and identify the actual dangers;
  • Take immediate and sensible precautions to prevent further risk;
  • Give spare clothing to the injured person and do your best to provide shelter
  • All reasonable efforts should be made to cope with the situation without resorting to the rescue services, providing that you do not make any injuries worse than they are already. If self-help is not possible, rescue services should be contacted. Call for 112. The rescue team will need to know where you are and have an idea about the condition of the victim;
  • If you do not have a mobile, you would have to use a nearby refugio, or descend to find a landline. Choose a safe route – this might not be the quickest, but the possibility of a second accident must be avoided;
  • Mark the casualties’ position on a map and take it along with you. Going for help is a relatively easy decision to make if there are four or more people in the party. At least two can leave to ring for help, leaving one to care for the casualty. If there are only two or three in the group then this becomes a more difficult judgement. In this situation, attracting help from others in the mountains will help;
  • To attract attention use the International Distress Signal, using either a light, a whistle or by shouting: six long flashes of a torch/blasts of a whistle/shouts/waves in succession, repeated at one minute intervals. Repeat until replied to. A reply is given 3 times a minute (every 20 seconds) in either a visible or audible manner. If a helicopter is involved, the pilot’s questions can be answered as described on the right;
  • If no local help is forthcoming a decision will have to be made to leave the casualty alone or potentially sending somebody on his or her own. To make this decision you would have to consider the injury, the conditions and the capabilities of the other members of the party; and
  • As far as the injured are concerned, do for them only those things that you are certain you can do safely.

Emergency Contact – Call 118

If the operator manning the emergency line does not speak English and you are unable to communicate, please try calling one of our staff and we will relate the information as best we can.

  • Call 118 – give your full name.
  • Say where you are calling from and let them know your telephone number.
  • If the location of the accident (and casualties) is far away, try to memorise some landmarks to help the search party find the group.
  • Explain in brief what has happened.
  • Give the time of the accident and the exact number of casualties and their relative conditions.
  • Give the number of people in the rest of the group still at the accident, and try to remember the colour of their jackets etc. in order to aid finding them.
  • Describe the weather conditions and the visibility.
  • Do not leave the place from which you are making the call, in case the rescue services have to contact you again.

Mountain Weather

We keep a firm eye on weather conditions and try to ensure it is safe to proceed with an excursion, but it is everybody’s responsibility to consider the possibility of cancelling an excursion (and voice any anxiety) if worried about the risk of adverse weather conditions.

  • Winds increase and temperatures drop at altitude
  • Snow and ice are not uncommon at high altitudes, especially in early and late season
  • Take plenty of liquid (min. 2-3 litres)
  • Protect yourself from the sun with high factor sun cream, sunglasses and a hat
  • Plan your route according to the weather
  • Plan for worse weather than forecast as the weather can change rapidly
  • Always carry clothing for poor weather, even if the day starts fine

Insurance
Andalucia Handbook Information

Travel Insurance with Campbell Irvine

Being adequately insured during your stay with us is essential - we strongly recommend you buy a comprehensive holiday insurance package at the time of booking. Having a travel insurance policy is one of the booking conditions for joining us on a Collett's Mountain Holiday.

If you have an existing insurance policy, please take the time to make sure it is up to date, and cover is adequate for your chosen destination and activity.

If you would like to obtain cover for your trip please feel free to contact specialist Insurance Brokers, Campbell Irvine Ltd for a quote by visiting their website or by telephone on 0207 938 1734.

The following declared activities are covered under the standard policy terms:

  • Walking up to 3,500m,
  • via ferrata
  • guided glacier treks
  • trekking to the summit of Marmolada

Collett’s Limited is an Introducer Appointed Representative of Campbell Irvine Ltd. who is authorised and regulated by the Financial Conduct Authority. This can be checked on the FCA's register by visiting the FCA's website at www.fca.org.uk or by contacting them on 0800 111 6787.