Walking Holidays

Europe’s majestic mountains ~ with a genuine specialist
Organised & Self-guided Walking

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Tel. 01799 513331 - - Open Today - 9am to 5.30pmCollett's Ltd. is ABTA bonded W6883 - Travel with confidence
Organised & Self-guided Walking with a Genuine Specialist

Located in the East Tyrol, on the doorstep of the Grossglockner, Austria’s highest peak, Matrei is a pretty mountain town at the heart of the Hohe Tauern mountain range, an undiscovered gem for UK walkers.

At Collett’s Mountain Holidays, we are naturally passionate about the quality of the walking, but the region itself is passionate about its cuisine and local produce. So, if you like BOTH your food and your mountain walks, then read on, because our base at the Hotel Hinteregger in Matrei is big on both.

The hotel is run by our friend, Katherina, who also farms land nearby – just as her father, grandfather and great-grandfather did. Using this land, she brings organic food from ‘Field to Fork’ – a process known locally as ‘Landwirtschaft.’

Beef Carpaccio in the East Tyrol - Austrian Alps Beef Carpaccio in the East Tyrol - Austrian Alps
Home made bread in the East Tyrol - Austrian Alps Home made bread in the East Tyrol - Austrian Alps
Pretzel in the East Tyrol - Austrian Alps Pretzel in the East Tyrol - Austrian Alps
Speck in the East Tyrol - Austrian Alps Speck in the East Tyrol - Austrian Alps
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Strudel in the East Tyrol - Austrian Alps Strudel in the East Tyrol - Austrian Alps
Goulash in the East Tyrol - Austrian Alps Goulash in the East Tyrol - Austrian Alps
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Kaiserschmarren in the East Tyrol - Austrian Alps Kaiserschmarren in the East Tyrol - Austrian Alps
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Meat production is looked after by Katherina’s husband, Bernd, a local vet, who has animal welfare high on his list of priorities. Herbs and veg are taken care of by Katherina’s mother, whose traditional farm garden is full of organic herbs and vegetables, all of which compliment Bernd’s carnal labour!

Imagine it – beef carpaccio with rocket salad! Pork filet with cranberries and red cabbage! Dumplings in a sage butter! All produced locally by the family.

As for breakfast, expect herbal teas, prepared locally; apple juice from the family orchard and hand-pressed; plus a variety of breads baked by Katherina’s mother each morning to a traditional family recipe.

At the Hotel Hinteregger, the ingredients speak for themselves. The focus is on honest, traditional Tyrolean cuisine made from home-grown and local produce. Nothing travels too far and nothing is out of place. Even the wine is local.

If you like being close to nature, a Collett’s walking holiday at the Hotel Hinteregger in Matrei is as good as it gets.

A beautiful hotel in exquisite surroundings in the heart of the Austrian Alps

  • Accommodation in the Austrian Alps with Collett’s
  • A luxurious hotel in the heart of Ehrwald

Hotel Romantik Spielmann
Walking Holiday Accommodation in the Austrian Alps - Hotel Romantik SpielmanWalking Holiday Accommodation in the Austrian Alps - Hotel Romantik Spielman

Hotel Romantik Spielman

A beautiful hotel in exquisite surroundings

Available from mid-June to late September, the Romantik Hotel Spielmann is an exquisite alpine gem on a similar level to the Hotel Panorama in the Dolomites. Located close to the village centre in its own beautifully-tended grounds, it simultaneously enjoys a secluded and peaceful spot with majestic views in all directions, notably the Zugspitze and Wetterstein ranges. To match all this charm, you can expect a warm and genuine welcome from the Spielmann family and a level of hospitality that is impressive and heart-warming. Built in 1926, the hotel is now in the hands of the fourth generation of the Spielmann family. The hotel oozes Tyrolean character and comfort: outside, frescos and vine trellises adorn the hotel and its attractive chalet-style outbuildings, such as the state-of-the-art health spa, connected to the hotel by a stylish glass walkway. Inside, the woodwork is ornate and the furnishings generous with bedrooms (included in the slideshow below) that are a treat to come back to after a day in the mountains.

For Office Hour, it is just a short walk to the Hotel Sonnenspitze in the centre of the village. You can join us here for a drink each evening (not Wednesday) between 6.30pm and 7.30pm and find out about the organised walks which are on offer the following day. Or you can chat with our own team of walkers in order to create your own self-guided itineraries, plan alpine activities or glean information about local places of interest.

For more information, availability and prices – click here to make an enquiry

Bedrooms, Cuisine & Spa
Walking Holiday Accommodation in the Austrian Alps - Hotel Romantik SpielmanWalking Holiday Accommodation in the Austrian Alps - Hotel Romantik SpielmanWalking Holiday Accommodation in the Austrian Alps - Hotel Romantik Spielman

Hotel Romantik Spielman

Delicious food and wellness facilities

This enchanting hotel combines tradition and modern alpine influences, and each room is furnished and finished to a high standard each with its own personal touches, mementoes from previous generations and rustic natural and wooden-carvings. Making for a feeling of home comfort with a special touch. You can choose between their ‘Standard’ Rooms or their ‘Comort’ Suites. The position of the hotel allows for mountain views in all directions, and every en suite room has a balcony with a unique view.

Unsurprisingly, you can expect to eat and drink superbly. Breakfast is comprised of an extensive healthy and hearty buffet, you can look forward to freshly-baked bread rolls, with a whole range of types of breads sourced from their local bakery, as well as freshly-brewed coffee and a selection of teas, along with meats, sausages, cheeses, jams and honeys, muesli, juices, fresh fruits and much more. Locally sourced eggs, cooked, scrambled or fried, can be freshly prepared to order by the chef.

Dinner takes the form of a gorgeous 5 course meal; consisting of salad or starter buffet, soup, a choice of four different main course options, dessert, and rounded off with a selection of fruit and cheeses. Occasionally, on warm summer evenings, the chef also fires up the grill on the sun terrace, which is extensive and accessed from french windows from the dining room. Twice a week the Spielmanns lay on speciality evenings, which include extra special gastronomic options and traditional Tyrolean music.

Where leisure and wellness facilities are concerned, you will be spoilt. An impressive new health spa opened in July 2018, with the new addition of a stunning infinity pool that combines indoor and outdoor swimming. Heated all year round to a very pleasant 33ºC, the indoor swimming area opens directly out into the outdoor area with stunning mountain views. The sauna area is perfect to come back to after a day’s walking. There is a spacious relaxation area inside, as well as a panoramic summer garden area with sun loungers. There is also a separate Spa complex that is adults only, with two different saunas and a steam room, along with relaxation areas. Various massages and treatments can be booked directly with the hotel. The Romantik Hotel Spielmann is the perfect option for those looking for something a bit special.

For more information, availability and prices – click here to make an enquiry

A big part of any holiday and experiencing a new culture is the food and the Tyrol region of Austria certainly has plenty to offer! During a week’s walking in the Zugspitze Arena you are sure to work up an appetite, fortunately the routes pass by some fantastic mountain huts and restaurants to keep your energy levels high. Here’s some local favourites for you to try.

Kaiserschmarren is sweet dish of thick shredded pancake served with apple sauce or fruit compote. These large dishes definitely make for a good lunch option and are usually big enough to share between two. Available at most mountain huts and restaurants but we’d recommend the Zugsplitzblick (on the beautiful 3 Lakes walk) or the Coburger Hutter (above the Seeben See lake) for a dish with a view.

Strudel has long been popular across Austria, with a number of flavours and styles, however we think we have found a true winner here in the Zugspitz Arena. The Apple & Raspberry Strudel at Wolfratshausen has been the favourite of many guests and is so popular we now call ahead to make sure they have enough for our hungry hikers.

Walking holidays in the Austrian Alps - food Walking holidays in the Austrian Alps - food
Walking Holidays in Tuscany with Collett's Walking Holidays in Tuscany with Collett's
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Walking holidays in the Austrian Alps - food Walking holidays in the Austrian Alps - food
Walking holidays in the Austrian Alps - food Walking holidays in the Austrian Alps - food
Walking holidays in the Austrian Alps - food Walking holidays in the Austrian Alps - food

One also cannot forget the fantastic bakeries in the region, from pretzels and pastries to the fantastic selection of cakes available. A favourite spot of ours for a post walk slice is the Pure Hotel in Lermoos with fantastic views over the arena meadows. Definitely deserved after a long walk day!

Despite being high up in the mountains we get some lovely hot days out here and a cool refreshing drink can definitely help put a spring in your step. We recommend a nice glass of Ski Wasser (Ski Water), a berry concentrate with sparkling water or lemonade, or a bottle of Alm Dudler, an apple and elderflower drink if you prefer something sweet.

On a more savoury note, the mountains are home to a range of delicious and filling meals to fuel your expeditions. Classics include Wiener schnitzel, dumplings and goulash however you may not have tried Tiroler Grӧstl. This traditional Austrian dish consists of a mix of potatoes, bacon and onion fried with cayenne pepper paprika and served with fresh parsley and a fried egg on top (or two if you’re lucky).

And finally although not food, most tend to enjoy a good drink whilst on holiday, we are lucky enough that Ehrwald is home to the Linzgieseder Schnapps factory, producing a range of fruity, herbal and fiery spirits to the Tyrol region. They open for factory tours on Wednesdays, and have a gift shop that is open every afternoon except Sundays, pick up a bottle for a perfect holiday gift or souvenir.

Whatever your taste there’s plenty to sample in Austria, so treat yourself. Guten-Appetit!!

After walking for five hours, ascending 1000 metres and with the summit of the highest mountain in Germany within our grasp, I took a moment to reflect upon our walk.

There was a lot to reflect upon! We had seen marmots slipping in and out of the rocks; watched a herd of horses gallop down the valley; we had watched people on the summit of the Sonnenspitze, a steeple-like mountain appearing inaccessible to humans; and we’d experienced spectacular views of the Mieminger range as its ridgeline traversed the sky. We had walked Collett’s Mountain Holiday’s “Zugspitze Challenge” and enjoyed every moment of it.

Upon reaching the summit of the Zugspitze, we were greeted with a magnificent panoramic view over hundreds of mountain peaks in four different countries. To the south-west we could see Italy and the outline of the Piz Bernina standing 4048 metres above sea level. To the east we could see the silhouette of the Grossglockner, Austria‘s highest mountain, and to the west was Switzerland, with more 4000 metre peaks. In the North were vast plains covering southern Germany all the way to Munich.

When standing on the top of Germany, it’s not hard to feel ecstatic!

Walking Holidays in the Austrian Alps - Zugspitz Arena Walking Holidays in the Austrian Alps - Zugspitz Arena
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Walking Holidays in the Austrian Alps - Zugspitz Arena Walking Holidays in the Austrian Alps - Zugspitz Arena
Walking Holidays in the Austrian Alps - Zugspitz Arena Walking Holidays in the Austrian Alps - Zugspitz Arena

But what did send me down memory lane, prompted a retelling about my final Zugspitze ascent in the summer of 2016? It was the notion that I am returning to the Zugspitz Arena in Austria for another season working for Collett’s! Cue the (I hope) sarcastic groans of disappointment from my colleagues. I’m super excited. Who knew that a simple Google search in 2016 for “Work summer amazing places Europe” would yield such dividends?

Walking Holidays in the Zugspitz Arena

It is comprised of three different areas. Looking at the arena from above, at the centre is the Moos, a circular field on the valley floor approximately two miles in diameter. The Moos often provided an ideal warm up during the start of a hike or, alternatively, an idyllic end when the legs are heavy. Early in the season wildflowers bloom here and the fields (and hills) are alive with the sound of music (sorry for the pun, I couldn’t help it). Walkers gaze in awe at the panoramic views of the surrounding mountains and it seems almost obscene that such ostentatious sights are so easy to obtain.

On the outer edges of the Moos are three villages: Biberwier, Lermoos and Ehrwald. Their locations within the arena yield unique views. Biberwier rests behind the steeple-like Sonnenspitze which looks very different from the rear. Its profile is triangularly shaped, less like a tower and a peak more like a pyramid cuts down the centre from its apex. Its face is sheer. Biberwier provides a waypoint for most southern walks and is the closest village to the unbelievably beautiful Blindsee lake.

The village of Lermoos is raised above the valley floor allowing unobstructed view across the Moos to the Zugspitze. Take a moment. Take two. Take as many as you like to appreciate, contemplate and meditate over the Zugspitze itself. At 2962 metres above sea level it stands literally hundreds of metres taller than the mountains in the neighbouring ranges. However, it is not the height of the Zugspitze which takes the breath away, more so its complete dominance of the skyline. It fills your visual spectrum and demands your attention. The absolute magnitude of the Zugspitze is highlighted by the village Ehrwald, which sits directly below the mountain. Ehrwald sits minute against the monstrosity of the Zugspitze. Curiously, last year, I found such contrast elicited existential musings from Collett’s guests about human significance, or its lack thereof, in the world.

The final village is Ehrwald. Tiny compared to the Zugspitze but the largest village in the arena, Ehrwald provides the accommodation for Collett’s guests (and u, the walk organisers!). The generosity of the locals match the size of the mountain they are beneath. The hub for our guests is the 4-star Hotel Sonnenspitze in the centre of Ehrwald. Despite the grand infrastructure, the employees and owners are grounded people who selflessly and willingly assist the Collett’s operation.

The final and most important component in the Arena are, of course, the mountains. They have been partly described already but deserve their own mention. There is surprising variety: On the Zugspitze, vegetation gives way to rock quickly, but on Mt Daniel bushes are seen almost to the summit; the spire of the Sonnenspitze is contrasted against the rolling nature of the Grubigstein. Thaneller stand alone, defiant, at the end of the Western valley and is a common target for the summit baggers. However, the broad variance between the surrounding mountains only serve to highlight their one commonality: their size. The sense of magnitude these mountains emanate is a major reason for why I am returning.

Collett’s guests are the other reason warranting my return. We had some wonderful characters! Eighty year olds as fit as a fiddle. We had families with four generations who went paragliding, white water rafting, horseriding and canyoning as well as walking. We’ve had those who have walked in the Himalayas, scaled Mt Kilimanjaro, who have climbed in Kalymnos, Scotland and Wales. We had guests on their first walking holiday abroad, fresh into the spirit of things, enjoying new-found camaraderie with like-minded walkers. We had a mix of people from countries far and wide, and many guests whose genuine manner and personality provided the essence why every week was different but always fantastic for us, the walk organisers.

This year Collett’s are introducing hut to hut hiking in the Austrian Alps and 2017 is looking like it will be a wonderful summer season in the Zugspitz Arena.

We look forward to meeting guests, new and old!

From Ehrwald, the Zugspitze cable car is silhouetted against the sky line. It is a marvel of engineering, with just two stanchions and ascending almost two thousand metres. The stanchions are immense and protrude from side of the Zugspitze at an angle which appear to defy physics. Near the higher stanchion is the Wiener-Neustädter Hütte, yet another Austrian hut which has a proud mountaineering history. From the valley, it takes hours to reach the hut, however, the hut itself is well stocked aas supplies and produce are lowered from the cable car above.

This Hut also provides the apex point for the Collett’s Wiener-Neustädter Hütte walk.

The Collett’s Wiener-Neustädter Hütte walk is one of the toughest walks in the Zugspitz Arena. It begins from the bottom of the Zugspitze cable car station and, after 1200 metres of elevation, surpassing the tree line and reaching ‘moonscape’ territory, it finally reaches the Wiener-Neustädter Hütte. The ascent is exposed with incredibly large drops; cables are provided in many sections and scrambling skills are of paramount importance. After reaching the hut from the North West, the path descends on the South West face of the Zugpitze down an immense scree slope which runs almost all the way down to Ehrwald. The walk is only recommended for the most mountain-hardy of guests and, without exception, has always received a positive response.

Bergfeuers and the Wiener-Neustädter Hütte Walk

Collett’s Wiener-Neustädter Hütte walk Collett’s Wiener-Neustädter Hütte walk
Collett’s Wiener-Neustädter Hütte walk Collett’s Wiener-Neustädter Hütte walk
Collett’s Wiener-Neustädter Hütte walk Collett’s Wiener-Neustädter Hütte walk
Collett’s Wiener-Neustädter Hütte walk Collett’s Wiener-Neustädter Hütte walk
Collett’s Wiener-Neustädter Hütte walk Collett’s Wiener-Neustädter Hütte walk
Collett’s Wiener-Neustädter Hütte walk Collett’s Wiener-Neustädter Hütte walk
Collett’s Wiener-Neustädter Hütte walk Collett’s Wiener-Neustädter Hütte walk
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Zugspitz Arena Bergfeuers Zugspitz Arena Bergfeuers
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Zugspitz Arena Bergfeuers Zugspitz Arena Bergfeuers
Ehrwald, Austrian Alps Ehrwald, Austrian Alps

At the beginning of July I walked the Wiener-Neustädter Hütte route with guests for the first time this season. We had an absolutely phenomenal day. Beyond the exquisite technical experience the walk itself offers, we were also lucky enough to see a family of Gams (chamois), make good friends with a herd of sheep and stand right above a rainbow. Cheers nature!

Before we opened the Wiener-Neustädter Hütte Walk to Collett’s guests I hiked the route to ensure it was in an appropriate condition. On the descent I encountered some strange activity. Flags of all different colours dotted the scree slope. They were spread across the area and there was more than 100 metres of ascent between the lowest and highest flag. Men were gathered and were consulting a bit of paper when I arrive. While friendly, they were all quite guarded so I took the hint and took my leave.

These were the Bergfeuer men or, in English, the mountain fire men.

On the 24th of June, these men set the surrounding mountains of the Zugspit Arena alight. Each flag I had seen represented a location of a fire and, when all the fires were burning together, they formed images for spectators on the valley floor. Traditionally the mountain fires were used to ward off evil demons and spirits and many of the images had Christian themes. Other images served to highlight the plant and animal world and human’s relationship with them. The objectives of other images were more ambiguous, like a picture of a Smurf standing above the village of Lermoos.

After dinner, with our guests wandered around the village soaking up the atmosphere. That night Ehrwald, which hosts the sleepy population of 2600 people, was inundated by folk who had come to see the Bergfeuers. Over 9000 people visited the Zugspitz Arena that evening. Biergartens were erected and the sound of live music drifted over the town. A thunderstorm was brewing in the South and the flashes in the distance created a truly powerful and unique atmosphere. Fortunately for us and, more importantly, the Bergfeuer men high in the mountains, the storm did not enter the valley.

The Bergfeuers event is a must see, a unique exhibition which is hosted by the Zugspitz Arena every year.

June the 24th 2018: put it in your diaries, have a word with Tom Collett and maybe we’ll see you here!

One hour west from the Zugspitze Arena, straddling the border between Germany and Austria are the Tannheim mountains. Known for cross country skiing and paragliding, as well as the Zugspitze Arena, the Tannheim region has also proved popular with Collett’s guests due to its own remarkable panoramic views.

The walk begins from the top of the Fussener Jochle cable car and traverses round to the Bad Kissinger Hütte and Aggenstein Mountain before returning to Gran, the hamlet where we parked. As we expected, the majority of Collett’s guests in the resort joined up for the fun, so we piled into the van and headed out, full of chatter and laughter.

Tannheim Range - Austrian Alps Tannheim Range - Austrian Alps
Tannheim Range - Austrian Alps Tannheim Range - Austrian Alps
Tannheim Range - Austrian Alps Tannheim Range - Austrian Alps
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Tannheim Range - Austrian Alps Tannheim Range - Austrian Alps
Tannheim Range - Austrian Alps Tannheim Range - Austrian Alps
Tannheim Range - Austrian Alps Tannheim Range - Austrian Alps

Choughed to be on a Collett’s day out: The Tannheim Ranges

In the valley the sun was shining and the day was beginning to warm up. However, at the top of the cable car we were immediately reminded of the stark wilderness that the Tannheim mountains provide. The cable car stands on the high outer ridge of the mountain range and clouds had descended into the bowl. Occasionally wisps of cloud boiled over the ridge, covering us and obstructing our vision. Fortunately, the cloud soon burned off and the famous 360 degree views appeared.

We set out just after 10am and made good progress. The track ascended a short way on the Western ridge line before heading into the ranges, and before long it was possible to see the Hut on the horizon against the back drop of the Aggenstein mountain, which still had its head in the clouds. With few stops and time for photos, our group reached the Hütte.

(Mountain) Location, location, location…

I’m continually astounded by the Austrians ability to construct beautiful Huts in amazing locations. The Bad Kissinger Hütte is one such building. With a proud mountaineering history, and located right on the border, the Hut is well equipped to cater for walkers, mountaineers, climbers and long-distance hikers. At this point our party split into two. My colleague Alex (who was feeling lethargic after climbing 1300 metres up Mt. Daniel the previous day), took half the group into the Hut for a hot lunch whilst my group ascended the Aggenstein mountain.

We started and very quickly the path became steeper, so much so that the final ascent had cables to assist scrambling. Just when I was starting to feel jealous of those enjoying hot lunches at the Hut, the scramble ended and all my thoughts of food were blown away as we reached the summit.

The views were phenomenal…

The flat lands of Germany ended against the sheer face of the Aggenstein. Across the West and South mountain ranges stretched into the distance. As we arrived a group of climbers were ascending the final pitch on the North-East face of the mountain and others were already at the summit enjoying a well-earned lunch. Alpine Choughs were present and scouring for food. The birds had no fear of humans and, by using the thermals running over the mountain, they could stall in the air, motionless and silent by our heads waiting to pick food from our hands. What was initially disconcerting quickly became hilarious as the birds starting landing on our heads, shoulders, knees (but not toes). When we descended to the Bad Kissinger Hütte, right before we regrouped, the Aggenstein treated us to one last piece of nature: a Hummingbird, gathering nectar from the alpine flowers.

After we had regaled the group who had stayed at the Hut with our experience (who may have cared more if their own lunch hadn’t been as fantastic as it sounded) we started descending back to Gran. The descent was long but group morale was high and, with much conversation and laughter, the time flew by.

A stream ran at the bottom of the mountain and there was no hesitation to have a paddle and soothe the feet. It was an ideal finish to the hike.

I noticed the van ride was considerably quieter on the return to Ehrwald than it was in the morning.

A vintage Collett’s Mountain Holidays walking itinerary.

Hohe Tauern, Austria
Half Board in Hotel Hinteregger or Self Cater in one of our Apartments

Hohe Tauern, Austria Prices 2019

Hotels

Hotel Hinteregger - Standard BedroomMatrei£810 pppw
Hotel Hinteregger - Comfort BedroomMatrei£885 pppw

Prices are for half-board accommodation and per person per week based on 2 people sharing an en suite bedroom.
Half-board accommodation includes bed, breakfast (7 days) & 3 course dinner with wine included (6 days).
Calculate price of stays of more or less than 7 days on a pro rata basis.
All prices include participation in our various daily organised walks.
B&B prices available on request.
Day Off – Wednesday – Breakfast is served as normal but there is no dinner or Office Hour - nor are there any organised walks.
Deposit - £100 per person – Balance due 8 weeks prior to departure.

Self Catering Apartments

Apartments (for 2 or 3)Matrei£485 pppw
Apartments (for 4 or more)Matrei£470 pppw

August supplements apply
Prices are per person per week and include gas, electricity, bed linen, towels and a small welcome pack.
Calculate price of stays of more or less than 7 days on a pro rata basis.
All prices include participation in our various daily organised walks.
Self catering guests are welcome to dine in Hotel Hinteregger with other guests – just ask a member of staff.
Deposit - £100 per person – Balance due 8 weeks prior to departure.

Discounts

Low Season5% off up to 14 June (incl.) & from 7 Sept. (incl.)
2 Week Stays5% discount
Triple Occupancy10% per occupant
Group Walking HolidaysContact us for details

Only one discount can be applied. The choice is yours!

Supplements

Single Occupancy in Hotel Hinteregger£100 per week

Notes

Notes

  • Prices are per person per week based on two people sharing a room.
  • Calculate the price of stays that are not 7 nights on a pro-rata basis.
  • Deposit – £100 per person.
  • Balance is due 8 weeks prior to departure.
  • Prices include participation in our programme of organised itineraries. Available five days a week throughout the summer and is completely optional.
  • Details of reductions and supplements below.

Accommodation Notes

Hotel Hinteregger

  • Half-board comprises accommodation, breakfast and four course dinner with wine.
  • Towels are provided and bedrooms are given a light clean every other day.
  • All bedrooms are en-suite.
  • Some bedrooms have a third bed and discounts are applied if these are used.
  • Office Hour is each evening in Hotel Hinteregger (except Wednesday).
  • Day Off – Wednesday – Breakfast is served as normal but there is no dinner or Office Hour – nor are there any organised walks.
  • B&B prices available on request.

Self Catering Apartments

  • Self catering prices include a welcome pack, gas, electricity, bed linen and towels.
  • Apartments are not cleaned during your stay.
  • Most of our self catering apartments have a double sofa-bed in the living area & discounts are applied when these are used.
  • Office Hour is each evening in Hotel Hinteregger (except Wednesday).
  • Day Off – Wednesday – there is no Office Hour – nor are there any organised walks

Payments

  • We accept cheques, debit cards and credit cards (Visa & Mastercard only). You can also pay by bank transfer.
  • There are no charges for credit cards, debit cards or cheques.
  • There is a £6 charge for all overseas Bank Transfers.
  • We are fully bonded with ABTA – guaranteeing 100% financial protection.

Making a Booking

  • If you would like to make a booking, please contact us by telephone on 01799 513331 so we can confirm your chosen accommodation is available. Accommodation enquiries can also be made online at enquiries@colletts.co.uk or preferably via our website enquiry page – please click here.
  • We will send you a booking form, whilst holding the accommodation in your name.
  • On return of the form and a deposit of £75 per person, we will immediately reconfirm your booking by email. Deposits can be paid by cheque or by debit or credit card or by bank transfer.
  • The final balance is due eight weeks prior to your departure. We will send you a Statement of Account as a reminder.
  • Two weeks before your holiday we will correspond with you for the final time sending you our Online Guest Handbook with packing suggestions, directions and arrival instructions for fly-drivers and self-drivers and lots more information to whet the appetite and to help you hit the ground running.
  • Two weeks before your holiday we will correspond with you for the final time sending you your Airport Transfer collection times if you have booked one. Please note our Airport Transfers are not private Taxis and waiting may be unavoidable.
  • We are happy to ‘hold’ rooms without commitment for a few days while you finalise travel plans or make arrangements with family or friends.

The life-affirming majesty of the Austrian Alps provides a soul-cleansing backdrop for any walking holiday. From cloud-piercing, snow-capped mountains to lush, green meadows and quaint chocolate box cottages, you’d be forgiven for thinking that the entire region had been conjured into existence… read more by filling in the form and downloading our guide below…

Here in our new destination, Matrei, we are very proud to find our home in the Hotel Hinteregger. Situated in the heart of the town and in view of its namesake the Hintereggkogel (2638m) this is a building steeped in both family tradition and award-winning modern architecture. Owned by the lovely Katharina, the hotel has been in her family for over 100 years and has been passed down from generation to generation, daughter to daughter.

The farmhouse from which it all started was built in the 1800s and has had many owners since, serving in part as the village cinema, theatre and, eventually, as guest rooms in 1962. This is when it’s rich history of conversions and extensions really began and since then the building has evolved into something of a spectacle. Its unique combination of old and new, both traditional and ground-breaking has seen it presented with prestigious architecture awards. The newer extension was constructed using natural materials which are perhaps most clearly noticed in the spa area’s melting pot of stone, wood, clay and glass. Through the glass panels the Mediterranean-style outdoor pool lies in the garden backed by a crisp mountain skyline.

Cozy space - Hotel Hinteregger Cozy space - Hotel Hinteregger
Dining Room - Hotel Hinteregger Dining Room - Hotel Hinteregger
Files in office hour Files in office hour
Files - Hotel Hinteregger Files - Hotel Hinteregger
Old Building - Hotel Hinteregger Old Building - Hotel Hinteregger
Building stairwell - Hotel Hinteregger Building stairwell - Hotel Hinteregger
Office Hotel Hinteregger Office Hotel Hinteregger
sauna loungers sauna loungers
Sauna Mirror Sauna Mirror
Sauna at Hotel Hinteregger Sauna at Hotel Hinteregger
Matrei office Matrei office
Swimming pool decking and stormy sky Swimming pool decking and stormy sky

 

History at the Hinteregger

Yet one can pass seamlessly from one modern corridor into another that simply breathes history. An illustrious central banister twists its way from the ground floor to the roof inside what is immediately recognisable as the original house. As well-kept and clean as its counterpart, this section of the hotel offers a more traditional homely and ultimately Tyrolean feel whilst never being more than a moment away from the clean-cut lines of the extension.

Downstairs the communal areas continue to strike the perfect balance between modern and spacious, with clean lines and lots of light whilst simultaneously being cosy and welcoming. The reception area is another example of how large expanses of glass can give way so easily to a burning fire, comfy leather sofas and commodious bookcases. A cast iron door set into the wall swings aside to reveal steps that plunge into what initially feels like a castle dungeon. Yet as the staircase winds down another gratifying mixture of the old and new awaits. A beautifully carved centre table sits in the centre of this stone walled room in the bowels of the building.

Intricate carpentry plays a role in many of the rooms too, continuing the Austrian feel. Whether in the new or the old part of the building the rooms are furnished with natural wood. In the modern extension they are flooded with light from the presence of the mountain views. The fusion of glass and wood is simple and complimentary to the landscape.

Relaxation at the Hinteregger

After a day out in the mountains it’s important to feel like you can unwind. This is why we chose the farmhouse parlour to hold our office hour. Accentuated by more detailed carpentry work this room has a more rustic feel. Here you can enjoy a beer or spritz and chat about the day before dinner. This is neighboured by another parlour which despite being renovated still displays the original panelling from generations before.

When it is time for dinner, you will be led into another space that’s seen the touch of modern design. A large and open-plan room with unique light installations is the perfect place to enjoy a sample from the hotel’s carefully chosen wine list and locally sourced menu. There is a four course meal on offer and salad bar at hand and wine is brought to the table by the hotel staff who take pride in knowing their wines, and the vineyards they come from. The food is proudly Tyrolean too and always fresh. The vegetables and herbs come from the hotel’s own garden, the cabbage and potatoes from the field, the meat mostly from its very own farm. Even the apple juice is pressed from their own fruit and the bread is freshly baked every morning on site by Katharina’s mother.

The Hinteregger’s farm

Much like the hotel, the Hinteregger’s farm has become more contemporary. The ecological nature of the farm has been modernized with care being taken to keep its essence unchanged. A photovoltaic system and a connected wood chip heating system provide the hotel with economical energy. All the while the farm’s cows continue to graze their summers away in the hotel’s pastures at Innergschlöss, they’ve even kept their names.

The focus of this hotel remains its family and its heritage. These modern additions are just a number in a long line of evolutions that each owner has brought about. We are excited to join Katharina in the venture of this ever changing and fascinating building.

The hotel’s awards

  • The 2007 Timber Award of Tyrol for the future-oriented and pioneering approach to construction.
  • The 2009 Tyrolean Restoration Prize for clear architectural language.
  • The Building Developer Prize 2010 recognized the bold innovative construction.
  • The Timber Prize for Interior Design in 2011 honoured the clear contemporary space composition in solid larch.

Check out our Hohe Tauern page for more information on walking trips in the area.